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Remember to keep safety first when buying children gifts for the holidays

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Fifty percent of all toys are bought during the Christmas season, according to the Federal Safe Kids Program. Parents, grandparents and everyone else should be mindful about what ends up under the tree. (Sinclair Broadcast Group)

This time of year, there is pretty much only one thing on children's minds.

Barbies, Legos and every other bright and shiny thing. And Christmas lists are already being written.

"We kind of start early, like, she's already pointed out some things to me the things that she wants and we're going to let Santa know she really wants a bike," said Lensey Ackerman, mom of a 4-year-old.

Fifty percent of all toys are bought during the Christmas season, according to the Federal Safe Kids Program.

Parents, grandparents and everyone else should be mindful about what ends up under the tree.

"CPSC's latest toy related injury and death data shows there have been about 14 toy related deaths and about 162,000 hospital emergency room toy related injuries," said Nikki Fleming of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Each year, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission takes a close look at every toy on the market. They're on the lookout for anything that might be a hazard, especially to very young children.

"The majority of those deaths were from choking on small parts and also riding toys," said Fleming.

Riding toys, like scooters or bikes, are popular with kids like Maggey.

"She's finally getting to the point of being able to ride a bike, so I think she's really wanting a bike from Santa," said Ackerman.

But kids and speed aren't always a good mix.

"If you choose one of those items as a holiday gift, you want to make sure you get the safety gear that goes with it," said Fleming. "So that would be your helmet, if you're looking at something like a skateboard, you also need the elbow pads, knee pads, and make sure that helmet is sized to fit,"

While you're strolling down the toy aisle, you also want to pay close attention to the labels. Check to see who the toy is intended for, again, use that age label as a guide and heed to those warnings. Again, avoiding small parts for younger kids, and for older kids, again, remember safety gear.

Small parts, which aren't always obvious, can lead to choking.

"For the choking hazards, small parts, small balls, round objects that can block off a child's airway," said Fleming

When you're buying toys with magnets or little batteries, make sure to keep them AWAY from little ones. they can be especially dangerous if they get swallowed.

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