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Making New Year's resolutions stick

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The time is here to make those New Year's resolutions. If you're sitting there, shaking your head, saying your goals often fail...we've got an approach you may like that shows what you need to do to stick it out. (Sinclair Broadcast Group)

The time is here to make those New Year's resolutions.

If you're sitting there, shaking your head, saying your goals often fail...we've got an approach you may like that shows what you need to do to stick it out.

A cold, winter morning in Oregon wraps up with sweat and smiles.

"We did 10 miles this morning and it's just a beautiful day," says runner Don Gallogly.

This Portland running company squad only huddles inside after braving the elements.

“It's fun,” Gallogly says, “it's a blast."

They meet weekly for adventures in the city.

"5k turned into a 10k and you get sucked in and here we are," says runner Frank Schaefer.

And not one of these three was born with a passion to pound the pavement.

"You have to find people that you like to run with," says runner Julie Baker.

"You're never too old; you can start any time," adds Schaefer.

Each of them started seriously running about a decade ago.

Don Gallogly did run in high school, “but I was terrible," he says.

Now he races once a month.

So, if resolutions so often fail, what's their secret to success?

"If you're going to start a fitness program, start at the beginning, make a smart goal," says Matt Hauck, program manager of sports performance at Providence Sports Medicine.

They've checked off every aspect.

Hauck says it is necessary.

Smart goals are specific, measurable and actionable.

"I think I am going to do a full marathon this year," says Baker.

"Run 5-6 times a week," adds Gallogly.

They're realistic to where you're at.

Shaefer didn't decide to run 31 miles during his first year of running, but it's his goal now.

"I have signed up for my first 50k, my first Ultra."

Lastly, make those goals time-bound and set a finish line.

Adds Hauck: "Generally, people who are making resolutions want to make a change and if people can figure out how to set those smart goals, they're going to be more apt to not only achieve those resolutions but continue them for 365 days into the next year."

A circle of cheerleaders also helps because external motivators are key. Maybe it's a financial investment where you're paying for a boutique studioor you want to expand your social circle.

"I can get out of bed a lot easier if I know I'm meeting someone and they're counting on me to show up, too," adds Baker. "I've met my best friends running and that's how I can keep in touch with them, too."

Tailor your resolutions to you and what warms you up inside.

"I love how I feel when I am done with a run," Baker says. "I just feel happy."

As you make your resolutions, remember to consult your doctor before changing any of your health routines.

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